MODERN LUXURY INTERIORS

MODERN LUXURY INTERIORS 

It is hard to not feel at peace when your eyes are gazing upon Miami’s majestic water views. Taking cues from the picturesque canal that this Sunset Harbor project sits on, Miami designer Jessica Jaegger of Jaegger Interior Design (jessicajaegger.com) created a tranquil vacation destination for the owners who were looking to dock their boat and embrace the water lifestyle Miami offers.

In collaboration with Plaza Construction (plazaconstruction.com), Jaegger and senior designer Giselle Torres Rodriguez completely reimagined the two-bedroom, 2 1⁄2-bath apartment; creating an interior design that maximizes the space while also taking advantage of the apartment’s position along the waterfront—making it feel more like a house and the perfect vacation oasis. To this end, it needed to be kid friendly and function in such a way that the couple and their family could access and move through the spaces comfortably—nothing untouchable or unapproachable, Jaegger says. However, the apartment itself isn’t a typical pied-a-terre. “We wanted the owners to feel at home,” she continues, “and to give them a space that they could truly use while still maintaining an elegant aesthetic.”

Sculptural, unique light fixtures from The Lighting Studio appear strategically placed throughout the unit. To maximize the size and height of the spaces, the designers used perimetral soffits with recessed LED lighting to provide homogeneous illumination throughout and help delineate each area in the open floor plan. In the dining room, a custom-built oversize mirror elongates the space and gives the room a more voluminous quality, reflecting back on the water vistas.

One of the challenges that presented itself during the design process was a large structural column right in the middle of the living and dining areas. The team embraced this as an opportunity and decided to clad the entire column in white oak panels, extending the paneling to the wall and creating a custom bar that frames, without completely dividing, the living and dining areas. What once felt like an obstruction now feels wholly integrated. “We cladded the column but kept an opening in the middle to minimize the impact of the wood,” Jaegger says of the waist- height opening. “No one would have guessed there was once a column in the middle of the living room.” Taking a look at the space now, one would never know that the built-in bar was not part of the original design concept.

Pulling inspiration from the water, Jaegger incorporated soft, neutral tones and added pops of color with furniture pieces that became focal points. While color is used sparingly in the space, accents of eggplant and terra cotta link together throughout, furthering the light but warm aesthetic. Different materials and textures catch your eye and aid in the serene feeling the owners and their guests experience while spending time here. The apartment features an abundance of light oak wood, glass and porcelain tile on the floor that evokes sandy beaches and complements the neutral, earthy tones used in the residence. “We wanted to incorporate wood without making the apartment feel too heavy,” Jaegger shares. So while the TV wall in the living room is sheathed in wood, a floating glass console breaks up the paneling and helps keep the space feeling airy and light. Staying away from heavier materials like velvet, linen wallpaper lines all the walls in the bedrooms and a bone-colored suede on the headboard in the primary bedroom creates an elevated sophistication; mirrors were once again used to visually expand the space.

In the powder room, natural stone forms a floating counter with an integrated sink, referencing an earthy undertone that travels through the design of the apartment. A three-dimensional mosaic tile lends dimension and adds further texture to the space. The quality craftsmanship of Italian furniture is evident in many of the pieces arranged throughout the unit, most of them procured through Luminaire including the quilted dining chairs that help convey a sense of calm and ease, and the mindfully crafted bed in the primary bedroom.

To accommodate the owners and their two grown children with families of their own, Jaegger and the team set out to create an inviting and luxurious space. “We wanted to work with materials that were resistant—it had to be practical but at the same time be elegant,” Jaegger says. “We wanted them to feel comfortable and relaxed in a sophisticated space, and that’s the reaction we got.”


LUXE MAGAZINE NAPLES

LUXE MAGAZINE NAPLES

INDUSTRY INSIDER

“The beauty in interior design calls for a well-thought-out process—elements must be carefully chosen to reflect the desires of those who will live in the space.”

When it comes to residential interiors, designer Jessica Jaegger strives to infuse each room with art and meaningful treasures. “I always wanted to work in an environment where I could combine functionality and aesthetics,” she says. That dream became a reality in 2011, when Jaegger founded her namesake firm, Jaegger Interior Design, drawing on earlier experiences working for an art collector and influences from her native city, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “The Brazilian modernism movement is part of who I am and what I experienced in terms of design while living in my hometown,” Jaegger continues. With an eye for natural materials and timeless decor, Jaegger mixes modern furnishings with antique accents. And the beauty in that balance certainly seems to resonate. Jaegger’s first project—remodeling a condo in Williams Island, Florida, for a furniture collector— quickly elevated her reputation, leading to collaborations with major brands and galleries. “I was lucky enough to have, as first clients, people who traveled the world and experienced art and design,” she adds. “They gave me the freedom to apply my design knowledge in their project and that gave me good exposure.” Now, Jaegger continues to put clients first, noting that: “Distilling precisely what they are looking for is what moves me.”

Up to this point, what do you feel has been your greatest success? Exercising sustainable ideas in one of my recent projects, which not only turned out aesthetically amazing, but also combined new principles of eco-conscious design.

What project would you love to take on? I’ve been dreaming of designing a farmhouse in the Hamptons, and a small boutique hotel in the Caribbean.

What is your next move? I am thinking of starting an online interior accessories boutique with carefully curated handmade ceramics, dishes, and decor designed by creatives from all over the world.


FLORIDA DESIGN

FLORIDA DESIGN

A Key Biscayne condo gets an art-friendly—and earth-friendly—makeover with a South American vibe.

As if the sensibilities of two continents came together with a Brazilian vibe, designer Jessica Jaegger and her South American clients were in total synchrony as they began to reimagining a 5,020-square- foot condo serenely positioned high above the beaches of Key Biscayne.

Dedicated to a kind of “organic minimalism” that would best show off their art collection and stay true to their environmentalist approach to living, the owners preferred a pared-down design— but one that would also create a warm home for their four children.

Jaegger notes her own commitment to natural woods and stone. She says she found delight in introducing the natural texture of wide-plank French oak flooring, of positioning a massive carved-marble James Irving dining table, and designing a paneled entry of three-inch French oak.

Because the owners specified that their new home’s walls be the white, expansive canvas upon which their many works of art would be showcased, other necessities that traditionally go on walls were spare. Unadorned cabinets and shelving crafted from white lacquered wood are found in the living room, dining room, and media room. Furniture is low and sleek. “The living room’s Poliform linen-covered sofa and the Sergio Rodrigues wood chairs never obscure the view of the water—or the walls,” says Jaegger. But what does turn all eyes is a dramatic chaise by Oscar Niemeyer: part caned rocker, part free-form sculpture.

Overlooking the dining area and its 9-foot- long Carrara marble table from Luminaire, a monolithic art photo by Vik Muniz shows “Beethoven” created from pieces of refuse— another nod to the environment.

From the dining room, a short trip down a hall to the media room allows the family to gather and play. Here, a hanging basket chair of woven polymer cord by Patricia Urquiola and an ultra- soft frameless sofa by Ligne Roset ensure comfort and informality.

Encircling the entire condominium, some of the 1,145 feet of broad balcony is seen from the expansive master bedroom. Here, a diminutive Nelson Swag desk and photographic art by Brazilian photographer Maritza Caneca complement the blues and greys found in the rug—and the reflections of the sea beyond. In the two master baths, bespoke glass mosaics cover the walls. The sense of serenity and space is heightened with the use of flooring in massive 36 by 36 inch marble slabs from Opustone.

While the master suite occupies one end of the apartment, the other three bedrooms and additional three and a half baths are at the other end. There, as with many young children, “bunking” with a sibling is better than sleeping alone. And in the case of a bedroom that comes with its own playhouse, Jessica Jaegger made a masterpiece. In pinks and greens and whites, each child finds a private space, with what appear to be under-bunk drawers that convert into beds for rollicking sleepovers. Even the overhead playhouse has a view.

And there are no worries if it’s not a “beach day.” The city-sea panorama can be enjoyed every day from wide outdoor galleries that expand the apartment’s living area. Nestled on the balcony and backed by thick tinted-glass panels that from afar, give the building a verdigris glow, Dedon’s round wicker sofa and utilitarian table and chairs seem to say, “Stay a while. And listen to the samba of the sea.”

“I pride myself in the unique touch that I bring to Brazilian modernism. My inspiration comes from nature—and living in Miami has allowed me to pull from the lush vegetation and the beautiful shades of the sunsets.” —Jessica Jaegger


FLORIDA DESIGN

FLORIDA DESIGN

As if the sensibilites of two continents came together with a Brazilian vibe, designer Jessica Jaegger and her South American clients were in total synchrony as they began to reimagining a 5,020-square- foot condo serenely positioned high above the beaches of Key Biscayne.

Dedicated to a kind of “organic minimalism” that would best show off their art collection and stay true to their environmentalist approach to living, the owners preferred a pared-down design— but one that would also create a warm home for their four children.

Jaegger notes her own commitment to natural woods and stone. She says she found delight in introducing the natural texture of wide-plank French oak flooring, of positioning a massive carved-marble James Irving dining table, and designing a paneled entry of three-inch French oak.

Because the owners specified that their new home’s walls be the white, expansive canvas upon which their many works of art would be showcased, other necessities that traditionally go on walls were spare. Unadorned cabinets and shelving crafted from white lacquered wood are found in the living room, dining room, and media room. Furniture is low and sleek. “The living room’s Poliform linen-covered sofa and the Sergio Rodrigues wood chairs never obscure the view of the water—or the walls,” says Jaegger. But what does turn all eyes is a dramatic chaise by Oscar Niemeyer: part caned rocker, part free-form sculpture.

Overlooking the dining area and its 9-foot- long Carrara marble table from Luminaire, a monolithic art photo by Vik Muniz shows “Beethoven” created from pieces of refuse— another nod to the environment.

From the dining room, a short trip down a hall to the media room allows the family to gather and play. Here, a hanging basket chair of woven polymer cord by Patricia Urquiola and an ultra- soft frameless sofa by Ligne Roset ensure comfort and informality.

Encircling the entire condominium, some of the 1,145 feet of broad balcony is seen from the expansive master bedroom. Here, a diminutive Nelson Swag desk and photographic art by Brazilian photographer Maritza Caneca complement the blues and greys found in the rug—and the reflections of the sea beyond. In the two master baths, bespoke glass mosaics cover the walls. The sense of serenity and space is heightened with the use of flooring in massive 36 by 36 inch marble slabs from Opustone.

While the master suite occupies one end of the apartment, the other three bedrooms and additional three and a half baths are at the other end. There, as with many young children, “bunking” with a sibling is better than sleeping alone. And in the case of a bedroom that comes with its own playhouse, Jessica Jaegger made a masterpiece. In pinks and greens and whites, each child finds a private space, with what appear to be under-bunk drawers that convert into beds for rollicking sleepovers. Even the overhead playhouse has a view.

And there are no worries if it’s not a “beach day.” The city-sea panorama can be enjoyed every day from wide outdoor galleries that expand the apartment’s living area. Nestled on the balcony and backed by thick tinted-glass panels that from afar, give the building a verdigris glow, Dedon’s round wicker sofa and utilitarian table and chairs seem to say, “Stay a while. And listen to the samba of the sea.”

“I pride myself in the unique touch that I bring to Brazilian modernism. My inspiration comes from nature—and living in Miami has allowed me to pull from the lush vegetation and the beautiful shades of the sunsets.” —Jessica Jaegger


MODERN LUXURY INTERIORS

MODERN LUXURY INTERIORS

HOW THE LIGHT GETS IN

An art-minded Brazilian couple opts for a neutral color palette to highlight the sea and sky.

When you open the front door of the ocean-facing unit on the 20th floor of this midbeach condominium, the infinite ocean views are overwhelming. “That was the inspiration,” said interior designer Jessica Jaegger, gesturing with a knowing smile toward the floor-to- ceiling windows and the spacious wraparound terrace with 180-degree views of the Atlantic. “Everything is horizontal. We didn’t want any tall lamps or accessories to take away from that view. It feels like it’s never- ending.”

It’s slightly overcast today, the morning after a storm, and the gray, flat light reflecting off the ocean conjures an Ansel Adams silver gelatin print. As poet Elizabeth Bishop describes in Pleasure Seas, “the water turns opaque, Pistachio green and Mermaid Milk.” This subdued, fleeting color palette, courtesy of Mother Nature, makes Jaegger’s monochromatic design scheme all the more striking. The condo is neutral, awash in white, creams, putty and sand tones, with decorative art pieces providing minimal pops of blues and greens—a reference to the ocean—as accents.

At 1,980-square-feet, with three bedrooms and three full baths, the condo is designed as a second home for a Brazilian couple from Sao Paulo with two adult sons. Jaegger worked closely with the wife on her vision of a neutral color scheme that would play harmoniously with the ephemeral, all-encompassing ocean. Bringing a piece of Brazil with them through custom furnishings by Brazilian vendors, including Artefacto and Ornare, was also important in creating a Miami home that they’d like to eventually live in full time.

With a symmetrical floor plan and a central terrace that juts toward the ocean in a palatial flourish, the living room is the condo’s focal point. Eclectic seating ranges from a creamy upholstered sofa and oversize bench to a white leather Eames lounge chair and ottoman and two leather folding chairs with silver frames reminiscent of those you might lug to the beach. These pieces are all centered around a glass coffee table that Jaegger found at Brazilian store One of a Kind. The piece is designed in quadrants, floating atop a glossy white platform, with three blue-green glass vases like bubbles from a crashing wave.

A Spanish porcelain tile floor by Valencia Coverings in a texture and color akin to well-groomed sand reinforces the feeling of suspended infinity. The floor is uniform throughout the entire unit. “She didn’t want patchwork,” Jaegger says of her client. “But more a fluid feeling of softness. The porcelain tile adds warmth.” With this in mind, the living room’s area rug was selected very carefully to nearly match the color of the porcelain floors as a continuation, as opposed to a contrast—its tan border the only indication that it’s even there.

There are architectural details such as recessed baseboards, doorframes and overhead LED lights throughout. “It makes the walls look like they’re floating,” Jaegger says. “Everything is flush and incorporated.” This floating effect is also achieved in the short entry hallway where three recessed LED lights are seemingly slashed into the wall creating texture and movement.

On the other side hangs a colorful, large-format mixed-media painting by Miami-based contemporary artist Anthony Liggins. The piece depicts a shelf of art books splashed with graffiti. “They saw the painting on Lincoln Road and fell in love with it, says Jaegger. “At first she was concerned that it was too much color, but I assured her it was okay. She’s very afraid of color.” Another art piece hangs in the living room, an abstract, sculptural work whose putty color is a near-match to the high-gloss lacquer found on the accent walls and structural columns.

Custom Ornare closets and cabinets in the same putty lacquer are installed in the adjacent kitchen, maximizing storage and streamlining the relatively small space. Set against the bright white barstools and chairs, they also add depth. A kitchen bar is lined in elevated glass to match a glass kitchen table with an oversize white Flos pendant light floating above, as if just another cloud sailing through the sky.
To further highlight the views, mirrors are installed that perfectly reflect the floor-to-ceiling windows in the kitchen, boys’ rooms and master bath. The design scheme remains constant between the three bedrooms, with textured wallpaper in oatmeal alternating between silk stripes and burlap solids from room to room. Above the bed in the master bedroom, a mirror-paneled wall reflects wraparound views of the glistening ocean, with two glass walls opening up to the terrace. The effect is powerful—some vantage points capture a horizon of 75 percent ocean and 25 percent sky.

With that ratio and so many reflective surfaces—ocean, sky, mirrors, glass, neutrals, white—Jaegger’s execution of the couple’s home will always be a blank canvas for Miami’s ever-changing spectrum of light.


LUXE MAGAZINE PB

LUXE MAGAZINE PB

INDUSTRY INSIDER

“The beauty in interior design calls for a well-thought-out process—elements must be carefully chosen to reflect the desires of those who will live in the space.”

When it comes to residential interiors, designer Jessica Jaegger strives to infuse each room with art and meaningful treasures. “I always wanted to work in an environment where I could combine functionality and aesthetics,” she says. That dream became a reality in 2011, when Jaegger founded her namesake firm, Jaegger Interior Design, drawing on earlier experiences working for an art collector and influences from her native city, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “The Brazilian modernism movement is part of who I am and what I experienced in terms of design while living in my hometown,” Jaegger continues. With an eye for natural materials and timeless decor, Jaegger mixes modern furnishings with antique accents. And the beauty in that balance certainly seems to resonate. Jaegger’s first project—remodeling a condo in Williams Island, Florida, for a furniture collector— quickly elevated her reputation, leading to collaborations with major brands and galleries. “I was lucky enough to have, as first clients, people who traveled the world and experienced art and design,” she adds. “They gave me the freedom to apply my design knowledge in their project and that gave me good exposure.” Now, Jaegger continues to put clients first, noting that: “Distilling precisely what they are looking for is what moves me.”

Up to this point, what do you feel has been your greatest success? Exercising sustainable ideas in one of my recent projects, which not only turned out aesthetically amazing, but also combined new principles of eco-conscious design.

What project would you love to take on? I’ve been dreaming of designing a farmhouse in the Hamptons, and a small boutique hotel in the Caribbean.

What is your next move? I am thinking of starting an online interior accessories boutique with carefully curated handmade ceramics, dishes, and decor designed by creatives from all over the world.


B&B ITALIA

B&B ITALIA

Born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Jessica Jaegger takes inspiration form Brazil’s rich design and architectural scene, combining it with a fresh take on modern interiors. For her, vintage and contemporary influences can coalesce in environments that feel familiar yet are new. She is the founder of J JAEGGER INTERIOR DESIGN, an established boutique Miami based firm specializing in high end residential projects.

What is a typical day in the life of Jessica Jaegger?
I usually start my day either going for an outdoor run or with a Peloton class.  After breakfast and feeling full of energy I go over the agenda for the day. My work days are very dynamic, so my calendar is my best friend and it’s based on it that I coordinate the things I need to do, from meetings with clients to visiting job sites or simply brainstorming for new projects.

What is, to you, a state of wellness while balancing life and work in this current time?
Just being able to dedicate quality time of my day to work out and take care of my personal life already makes all the difference. I am extremely organized, a planner at heart, so balancing both areas of my life is always a priority.  During the quarantine I never stopped working but I found myself with more time in my hands for self-care.

How do you set your mindset right in these more challenging times?
I definitely consider working out to be my mean of releasing stress and getting my thoughts and ideas together. It helps me both mentally and physically.

Who has shaped your outlook on life the most, how do you adapt it to your life?
My parents have helped me shape my goals and aspirations in life more than anybody. They have always been great examples of hard work and resilience and always taught me to be patient, but focused and hopeful.

How has it been for you individually in forging ways and establishing your grounds as a woman in this design world?
It actually happened very naturally. I’ve always been passionate about design and started working at a young age. By the time I decided to open my own firm I felt very confident and was able to deal with the difficult situations we always encounter.  Being a woman in the design field and having to deal with the construction side of it, can be challenging sometimes. But when you trust your experience and vision and know how to relate with people well, it makes it all more fluid and easier.

Describe yourself as a teenager in 3 words.
Energetic, fun, disciplined

What’s the best piece advice you’ve received?
If you want to grow in the design business, learn to delegate work. Be in control, but don’t try to embrace everything yourself or micromanage other people’s work. Give them responsibilities and trust them.

What’s in your handbag right now?
A measuring tape (always with me), a notepad (yes, I’m old school), a small make-up bag (gotta be ready at any time), business cards, phone and wallet.

Dark chocolate or milk chocolate?
Dark chocolate

How would you describe your perfect weekend in Miami.
My perfect weekend starts with a healthy breakfast at Pura Vida in the Miami Design District, followed by a day at Soho House -between the beach and the rooftop bar for some spicy margaritas. A delicious dinner with my husband and friends at KYU in Wynwood.


LUXE MAGAZINE

LUXE MAGAZINE

INDUSTRY INSIDER

“The beauty in interior design calls for a well-thought-out process—elements must be carefully chosen to reflect the desires of those who will live in the space.”

When it comes to residential interiors, designer Jessica Jaegger strives to infuse each room with art and meaningful treasures. “I always wanted to work in an environment where I could combine functionality and aesthetics,” she says. That dream became a reality in 2011, when Jaegger founded her namesake firm, Jaegger Interior Design, drawing on earlier experiences working for an art collector and influences from her native city, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “The Brazilian modernism movement is part of who I am and what I experienced in terms of design while living in my hometown,” Jaegger continues. With an eye for natural materials and timeless decor, Jaegger mixes modern furnishings with antique accents. And the beauty in that balance certainly seems to resonate. Jaegger’s first project—remodeling a condo in Williams Island, Florida, for a furniture collector— quickly elevated her reputation, leading to collaborations with major brands and galleries. “I was lucky enough to have, as first clients, people who traveled the world and experienced art and design,” she adds. “They gave me the freedom to apply my design knowledge in their project and that gave me good exposure.” Now, Jaegger continues to put clients first, noting that: “Distilling precisely what they are looking for is what moves me.”

Up to this point, what do you feel has been your greatest success? Exercising sustainable ideas in one of my recent projects, which not only turned out aesthetically amazing, but also combined new principles of eco-conscious design.

What project would you love to take on? I’ve been dreaming of designing a farmhouse in the Hamptons, and a small boutique hotel in the Caribbean.

What is your next move? I am thinking of starting an online interior accessories boutique with carefully curated handmade ceramics, dishes, and decor designed by creatives from all over the world.